William Wordsworth, Part 2 – Prelude

William Wordsworth’s Prelude represents an extremely personal and philosophical turn in Wordsworth’s work. A great deal of personal information is conveyed in this work.

Wordsworth began The Prelude in 1798 at the age of 28 and continued to work on it throughout his life. He never gave it a title; he called it the “Poem (title not yet fixed upon) to Coleridge” and in his letters to Dorothy Wordsworth referred to it as “the poem on the growth of my own mind”. The poem was unknown to the general public until published three months after Wordsworth’s death in 1850, its final name given to it by his widow Mary.

Link to Video about Prelude

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s